Posts by Yuriy Matsiyevsky

Yuriy Matsiyevsky 12-04-2018
(Communist and Post-Communist Studies) Abstract: What effects does a revolution have on the stability or change of a hybrid regime? Has the Ukraine's regime changed since the 2014 revolution? To answer these questions I examine the changes in formal and informal institutions and the quantitative and qualitative composition of elites after the change of power in Ukraine in 2014. I argue that despite greater than in the post-orange period quantitative...
Yuriy Matsiyevsky 06-13-2015
(Wilson Center) The fluctuating intensity of warfare in the Donbas region should be seen neither as a step toward freezing the conflict nor toward achieving a lasting peace. While Russia remains nominally unrecognized as party to the conflict by the West, the Minsk II agreement may well share the ineffectual fate of its predecessor, Minsk I. To avoid this fate, the West, and the U.S. in particular, must recognize Russia a party to the conflict. There are...
Yuriy Matsiyevsky 11-24-2014
В аналитической записке для PONARS Eurasia «Внутренние факторы восстания на Донбассе», и в ответе на критические замечания Андреаса Умланда, Сергей Куделя стремится убедить читателей, что «восстание на Донбассе является,  прежде всего, внутренне-обусловленным явлением». Соглашаясь с тем, что «структурные возможности» (фрагментация государства, насильственная смена режима и низкий принудительный потенциал власти) и «групповые эмоции» (обида и страх)...
Yuriy Matsiyevsky 11-04-2014
Last week’s parliamentary elections in Ukraine had two major goals, one public and one private. Publicly, the elections sought to renew the legislature from the remnants of the Yanukovych era, releasing the country from the stain of the infamous "dictatorship laws" of January 16, 2014. Privately, President Poroshenko sought to obtain a political majority in the parliament so that he could form a “president’s government.” One worry was that if these two...
Yuriy Matsiyevsky 10-31-2014
In his recent PONARS Eurasia policy memo entitled “Domestic Sources of the Donbas Insurgency” and subsequent response to Andreas Umland’s critical remarks, Serhiy Kudelia seeks to convince the readers that “the Donbas insurrection [is] primarily a homegrown phenomenon.”  While agreeing that “structural feasibility” (state fragmentation, violent regime change, and the government's low coercive capacity) and “group emotions” (resentment and fear) are...

About the author

Associate Professor, Department of Political Science
Ostroh Academy National University, Ukraine