Shairbek Juraev 16 Apr 2013
This month Kyrgyzstan celebrates the third anniversary of the overthrow of country’s second president, Kurmanbek Bakiev, which led to major changes in the country’s structure of governance. Three years on, a more inclusive political power sharing system appears to remain the key tentative achievement of the “April Revolution.” One can indeed observe a drastic difference in the way political governance is set up. In direct contrast to pre-2010,...
Sufian Zhemukhov 12 Apr 2013
Since the 2008 war with Georgia, Russia has regularly held military maneuvers on the Black Sea. This March, about 30 ships, 7,000 personnel, and more than 20 airplanes and helicopters participated in the “snap” drills of the Russian army on the Black Sea. Vladimir Putin issued the order for the maneuvers from his presidential airplane on his return to Sochi after his visit to the Republic of South Africa. In spite of the large-scale maneuvers...
Andrey Makarychev 08 Apr 2013
When Manfred Sapper, editor-in-chief of the German Osteuropa journal, in his public discussion with the Belorusian writer Sviatlana Kurs asked, “What does Germany have to do with the Lukashenko regime?", it looked like a tacit indication of the crisis of Berlin's Ostpolitik. Perhaps, Dr.Sapper's approach is right: since neither Political Science nor International Relations give a more or less clear answer to this question, why don't we start...
Serghei Golunov 05 Apr 2013
(CEURUS Paper) Abstract: A number of malpractices, including corruption, cheating and abuse of power by superiors flourish in the Russian higher education system. As authorities turn a blind eye to at least some of such problems, this leads to a devaluation of Russian diplomas and degrees and a normalization of misconduct in academic environment. This (as well as similar practices in some EU member states’ universities) could reveal itself in...
Robert Orttung 05 Apr 2013
(The New York Times) (Co-author: Christopher Walker) — When Russian tax and law enforcement authorities recently raided the Moscow offices of Human Rights Watch, they invited a television crew from one of the country’s key state-controlled broadcast networks, NTV, to film the proceedings. State news television cameras similarly tagged along when government inspectors staged raids of other NGOs, including Amnesty International and the human...
Kornely Kakachia 04 Apr 2013
(Policy Brief) Often considered to be a “beacon of democracy” in the post-Soviet space, Georgia has publicly committed itself to establishing the rule of law and building Western-style democratic institutions. As Georgia’s ambitions to draw closer to Europe and the transatlantic community have grown and the country has assertively reclaimed its European identity, its relations with neighbouring Russia have deteriorated. Simultaneously, as the...
Nikolay Petrov 03 Apr 2013
(Moscow Times) The authorities have initiated an unprecedented campaign against nongovernmental organizations, conducting burdensome inspections of their offices in Moscow, St. Petersburg, Perm, Krasnodar, Vladivostok, Novosibirsk, Rostov-on-Don and dozens of other cities. Reports from more than two dozen regions indicate that hundreds of human rights, religious, educational and cultural organizations had been subjected to checks, including...
Sufian Zhemukhov 02 Apr 2013
Relations between Russia and Georgia are going through some changes after the new government came to power in Georgia. If before, Saakashvili and Putin/Medvedev had been exercising a policy of pure hostility toward each other, the new Georgian policy is to persuade a reluctant Russia of Georgia's good intentions. Two recent news items, contradicting each other, demonstrate the new ambiguity in Georgian-Russian relations. From one side, Georgian...

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