Policy Memos by Randall Stone

Randall Stone 07-23-2012

Russia's current leadership recognizes the instrumental value of multilateral institutions and has adapted its foreign and economic policies to exploit them. This represents an important opportunity for the United States, whose major foreign policy objective toward...

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Randall Stone 07-23-2012

As weakened as it has been by its prolonged and poorly executed transition from central planning to a market economy, Russia remains a key player in international security. Geographically, Russia lies astride...

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Randall Stone 07-23-2012

Since 1993 Russia has been negotiating to join the World Trade Organization (WTO), which with 144 members is one of the world’s largest and fastest-growing clubs. With the successful conclusion of the GATT’s Uruguay Round of trade negotiations, the cost of exclusion...

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Randall Stone 07-23-2012

Having successfully rescheduled its debt to foreign commercial banks through the London Club last fall and obtained a reduction of principal and interest rates, Russia now turns to the Paris Club of government creditors. What are the prospects for a similar agreement...

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Randall Stone 07-23-2012

The last year has seen a sharp turn in public opinion against Western assistance to former Communist countries, driven in large part by lurid scandals about the misuse of funds from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank in Russia and Ukraine. In...

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Randall Stone 07-23-2012

What can we learn about Russia by comparing it to the other post-Communist countries? In particular, what can we...

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Randall Stone 07-23-2012

We have to recognize that the Russian financial meltdown is a product of two factors: (A) a policy of accumulating debt to cover huge Russian fiscal deficits, which had been pursued since 1995, and was unsustainable in the long run, and (B) the increased volatility...

Randall Stone 07-23-2012

This policy memo discusses economic reform in Russia and the role of the US government between 1992 and 1998. It begins by reviewing the general strategy of shock therapy in Eastern Europe, comparing it with what actually happened in Russia. It then highlights the...

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About the author

Professor, Director of the Skalny Center for Polish and Central European Studies, Director of the Peter D. Watson Center for Conflict and Cooperation, Department of Political Science
University of Rochester