Policy Memos | Аналитические записки

Policy Memo # 392
Mikhail Alexseev 15 Oct 2015
Since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February 2014, an armed conflict over the Donbas region has resulted in nearly 8,000 people dead, more than 10,000 wounded, and over 1.1 million displaced, according to the United Nations. Aside from continuing loss of life, social research suggests that a sustained violent conflict could also radicalize Ukraine’s internal ethno-cultural and political divides. At stake are fundamental processes in...
Policy Memo # 391
Kimberly Marten 13 Oct 2015
Non-state (or “informal”) militias play crucial roles on both sides of the conflict in eastern Ukraine. They serve as force multipliers and, in some cases, provide plausible deniability for brutality. However, governments that support informal militias also face a “principal-agent problem,” whereby militias have interests and goals that do not always match those of the state, be it Russia or Ukraine. One way for at least Kyiv to...
Policy Memo # 390
Volodymyr Dubovyk 13 Oct 2015
The Ukrainian region and city of Odessa, situated on the Black Sea adjacent to Romania and Moldova (and Transnistria), was a major focal point during the Euromaidan, the annexation of Crimea, and Russia’s further intervention in Ukraine. Locals were forced to take positions on issues of identity and territorial integrity that they had never confronted before. Despite the rise of a local separatist movement and violence, the presidential and...
Policy Memo # 389
Volodymyr Kulyk 29 Sep 2015
One of the most talked about consequences of recent events in Ukraine is a dramatic transformation in Ukrainian national identity. Social activists and various elites regularly assert their increased self-identification as Ukrainians, pride in Ukrainian citizenship, attachment to symbols of nationhood, and readiness to defend and work for Ukraine. Most speak of their own experiences or those of people around them, while others generalize these individual...
Policy Memo # 388
Sean Roberts 15 Sep 2015
Of all the Central Asian states, Kazakhstan has been most successful in balancing its foreign relations with a variety of global powers. The country has even branded its foreign policy as “multi-vector” to accentuate its success in maintaining a diverse set of international partners. Whether Kazakhstan’s multi-vector foreign policy is the result of conscious policy planning or an outcome of necessity is unclear, but one cannot dispute...
Policy Memo # 387
Arkady Moshes 08 Sep 2015
It is common to portray the European Union (and the United States) as unwaveringly in support of isolating Belarus. The reality is somewhat different. Over the last two decades, EU-Belarusian relations have been cyclical. In the most notable cycle, a cooling in the first half of the 2000s was followed by a rapprochement that peaked over 2008-2010, when the EU had high expectations of successful engagement and offered Belarus generous financial assistance...
Policy Memo # 386
Charles J. Sullivan 04 Sep 2015
(Guest contribution) The city of Kabul has fallen on three occasions over the past generation: to the mujahedin in 1992, the Taliban in 1996, and the Northern Alliance (supported by a U.S. aerial bombing campaign) in the aftermath of September 11. Since the Taliban’s overthrow, the United States has spearheaded a costly state-rebuilding effort but with little to actually show for it. U.S. military forces now appear to be intent on...
Policy Memo # 385
Nicu Popescu 02 Sep 2015
The emergence in 2015 of the Eurasian Economic Union (EEU) on the map of regional integration initiatives occurred in a difficult regional context. The war in Ukraine and ensuing tension in Russian-Western relations were sparked—but not caused—by divisive trade-related matters that began to unfold in 2013. Even before its formal unveiling, therefore, the EEU was thrown into the middle of a major crisis, which focused attention on the...
Policy Memo # 384
Sebastien Peyrouse 31 Aug 2015
In 2011, then U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton rolled out a plan for Central and South Asia: “Let’s work together to create a new Silk Road. Not a single thoroughfare like its namesake, but an international web and network of economic and transit connections. That means building more rail lines, highways, energy infrastructure….” Unfortunately, the logic of the U.S. government’s New Silk Road (NSR) Initiative is not...
Policy Memo # 383
Alexandra Yatsyk 28 Aug 2015
Tatarstan and Chechnya, two federal republics with strong Islamic elements in their regional identities, have nimbly positioned themselves within the “Russian world,” an ideological concept that has increased in prominence since the outbreak of the Ukraine conflict. Both republics have sought to raise their visibility within the Russian Federation and promote themselves as regional success stories, but their policies differ in many respects....

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