Policy Memos | Аналитические записки

Policy Memo # 422
Arkady Moshes 03 Mar 2016
(PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo) Since July 2014, when Malaysian Airlines MH17 was shot down over the Donbas, the European Union has demonstrated an unprecedented level of solidarity with Ukraine that extends far beyond macroeconomic and technical assistance. Even with the conflict still active, the EU has worked to incrementally integrate Ukraine into its economic and legal spheres. This January, the Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Agreement (DCFTA),...
Policy Memo # 421
(PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo) In the fall of 2015, Russia resolved to raise the stakes in Syria by launching an air campaign at the request of Damascus. The intervention was partly driven by considerations directly related to the Middle East, including concerns about stability in this region neighboring Eurasia and linkages to domestic terrorist threats.[1] But Moscow also launched its operation in pursuit of major instrumental goals. First, it saw an...
Policy Memo # 420
George Gavrilis 12 Feb 2016
(PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo) When it comes to Russia’s geopolitics, the international community has a lot to grumble about. In the course of a few short years, Moscow annexed Crimea, fueled a civil war in eastern Ukraine, dismantled its relations with Turkey, and embarked on a unilateral military campaign in Syria. As Russia’s military operations in Syria intensified, European Council President Donald Tusk warned that Moscow’s actions...
Policy Memo # 419
Sebastien Peyrouse 10 Feb 2016
(PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo) For more than twenty years, Uzbekistan has had no real political change and remains one of the most authoritarian countries in the world. How has President Islam Karimov held onto the reins of power for so long? Although he has used violence to repress threats to his regime, the longevity of his rule cannot be explained by the use of force alone. Authoritarian regimes rely on multiple means to sustain their grip on power and...
Policy Memo # 418
Eric McGlinchey 01 Feb 2016
(PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo) U.S. policymakers confront a paradox in Eurasian politics: more pluralistic Central Asian states are more prone than the region’s solidly authoritarian states to ethno-nationalist violence. In particular, Kyrgyzstan’s and Tajikistan’s turn toward nationalism has been problematic for these two countries’ ethnic minorities, but it also has implications for U.S.-Kyrgyz and U.S.-Tajik relations. Kyrgyzstan...
Policy Memo # 417
Keith Darden 28 Jan 2016
(PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo) Recently, Russian policymakers and strategists have articulated a vision of a vibrant non-Western world, one in which the United States and European leaders are increasingly marginal and where Russia plays a leading role. In official statements, presidential speeches, and in presentations by government officials, Russian officialdom has presented the case that this non-Western world is vital and growing.[1] In official telling...
Policy Memo # 416
Marlene Laruelle 27 Jan 2016
(PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo) Many observers of Russian political life have noted a shift in President Vladimir Putin’s language toward greater “ethnonationalism.” While this trend has been present for a few years, it became especially prominent after the start of the Ukraine conflict. In his March 2014 speech justifying the annexation of Crimea, Putin stated that Crimea was a russkii (Russian) land, Sevastopol a russkii city, and Kiev...
Policy Memo # 415
Theodore Gerber, Jane Zavisca 20 Jan 2016
(PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo) Due in part to the legacy of the Soviet system, in which the state allocated housing to families and individuals on the basis of non-market principles, and in part to endemic housing shortages in the post-Soviet era, housing concerns are an important potential source of political grievances in post-Soviet states. Data from the Comparative Housing Experiences and Social Stability survey we conducted in Azerbaijan, Kyrgyzstan,...
Policy Memo # 414
Reflecting on the Russian debate about the “national interest,” prominent political analyst Gleb Pavlovsky has said: Today, there are no centers that would work to delineate Russian national interests, nor politically rigorous terminology that could be used for that purpose. Everything being written on this topic is fiction, often politically irresponsible. We hear fairytales about supremacy, telling the other countries that they are no...
Policy Memo # 413
Nona Shahnazarian 14 Jan 2016
(PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo) Last summer, anger about electricity rate increases revealed the Armenian public’s pent-up dissatisfaction on a range of issues, including the government’s willingness to allow Russia to continue controlling the country’s economy. Underlying the so-called “Electric Yerevan” street protests was a civic desire to have a say in how the country is run. While the protest movement soon receded, it...

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