Policy Memos | Аналитические записки

Policy Memo # 587
Oxana Shevel 11 Apr 2019
(PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo) The post-World War II era, and especially the post-Cold War era, has seen the global spread of dual citizenship. Not only have the number of de-facto dual citizens proliferated, but more and more states, starting with the West European democracies, have amended their legislation to explicitly recognize and allow dual and multiple citizenships. Situating post-Soviet states in this global pattern reveals some similarities...
Policy Memo # 586
Andrey Makarychev 29 Mar 2019
(PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo) In 2018, many former Soviet republics celebrated their anniversaries of independence gained by the collapse of the Russian empire one hundred years ago. These remembrance events gave these countries the opportunity to peer into their century-long experiences of autonomy, independence, and subsequent forceful inclusion into the Soviet Union. Over this time, they produced new narratives of political legitimacy and subjectivity,...
Policy Memo # 585
David Szakonyi 29 Mar 2019
(PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo) The use of sanctions to push Russia to change its foreign policy behavior has come under heated debate. Proponents argue that the sanctions policy pursued by the West has imposed sizeable costs on the Russian economy. Critics counter that Russia may not have incurred sufficient pain to pull back from its foreign policy adventurism. Broad macroeconomic overviews claim that sanctions have worsened the investment climate and...
Policy Memo # 584
Guzel Yusupova 26 Mar 2019
(PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo) Setting aside debates over how ethnocentric Russia’s contemporary nation-building strategy is and whether this strategy began before or after Putin, it is important to consider the effects of this strategy on Russian society.[1] How is the increasingly ethnicized, Russian-centric form of official nationalism changing perceptions of what Russia is? I argue that the current social mobilization around language and border...
Policy Memo # 583
Anna Sanina 22 Mar 2019
(PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo) Patriotism in Russia is deeply rooted in the Soviet era and communist doctrines. It is the cornerstone of the country’s identity, national security, military manifestation, and the “openness” or “closeness” of its society to the world. Not surprisingly, the Russian leadership is regarded in the West as the most interested mover of patriotic trends—take for example the 2012 The New York Times headline “Putin, in Need of...
Policy Memo # 582
Emil Dzhuraev 21 Mar 2019
(PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo) In October 2017, Kyrgyz President Almazbek Atambayev oversaw a peaceful and orderly election and the installation of a new president, all in accordance with the constitution. For the first time, apparently, a truly peaceful handover of power took place and Kyrgyzstan could now claim that it had made a significant step toward democratic consolidation. In reality, the processes were highly problematic. The campaigning and the...
Policy Memo # 581
Judyth Twigg 18 Mar 2019
(PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo) After first exploding among people who inject drugs in the late 1990s, HIV/AIDS now presents a serious public health and social challenge in Russia. The threat was initially mitigated through energetic interventions from civil society, largely financed by the global health community, that attempted to introduce best-practice prevention and treatment strategies. President Vladimir Putin’s third term and the consequent...
Policy Memo # 580
Yuriy Matsiyevsky 08 Mar 2019
As the March 31 Ukrainian presidential elections approach, warfare continues in the east, and national reforms falter, analysts warn about the resurgence of old-- and the emergence of new--authoritarian threats in Ukraine. On the one hand, they argue that the ongoing war with Russia is used by the Poroshenko regime to strengthen its hold on power and encroach on citizens’ civil rights and freedoms. Every time the incumbent president runs for reelection,...
Policy Memo # 579
Marlene Laruelle 06 Mar 2019
Of Russia’s 146 million citizens (if we include those in Crimea), 63 million—or 43 percent—are under 34 years of age. Of these, 30 million belong to Generation Y (millennials in their 20s and early 30s), 15 million belong to Gen Z (teenagers), and a further 18 million are part of the youngest generation (less than 10 years of age).[1] Russia’s youth have recently become the object of Western media interest with articles exploring everything from their...
Policy Memo # 578
Dmitry Gorenburg, Paul Schwartz 01 Mar 2019
To great fanfare, in May 2016, Russia hosted the third ASEAN-Russia Summit at the Black Sea resort of Sochi. Commemorating the 20th anniversary of Russia’s acceptance as an ASEAN dialog partner, this summit was intended to give new impetus to longstanding efforts by Russia and Southeast Asia to forge closer economic and security ties. Defying efforts by the West to isolate Russia, leaders from all ten ASEAN member states attended the summit.[1] Despite...

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