South Ossetia

Policy Memos | Аналитика
Eiki Berg 01 May 2018
(PONARS Policy Memo) De facto states operate against unfavorable international legal conditions, combined with manifest security threats and widespread political disengagement from the international community. Moreover, they are affected by a mix of economic sanctions and are forced into socio-cultural isolation. This leads to an enduring “do or die” dilemma where de facto states either seek protection from external patrons (“do”) or face the...
Policy Memos | Аналитика
Kornely Kakachia 15 Apr 2018
(PONARS Policy Memo) Russia’s swift achievement of its political objectives in Crimea while firing hardly a shot generated much debate about the use and effectiveness of “hybrid warfare.” Although the term lacks a clear definition, it refers to Moscow’s use of a broad range of subversive instruments, many nonmilitary, to further the Kremlin’s domestic and international interests. While Russia’s use of hybrid strategies has grown markedly in recent...
Sergey Markedonov 22 Jun 2016
(Carnegie Moscow Center) Over the past few years, the situation in and around South Ossetia has frequently incited heated debates. A new status quo was established in the Caucasus following the five-day war between Russia and Georgia in August 2008, when Moscow formally recognized South Ossetia as an independent sovereign state. The war also transformed Moscow from a peacekeeper and moderator into South Ossetia’s patron, the guarantor of its...
Sufian Zhemukhov 16 Jul 2013
Last month (June 13), the UN General Assembly adopted a Georgia-initiated resolution about the situation in Abkhazia and South Ossetia. Similar to the previous five resolutions, this one acknowledges the territorial integrity of Georgia and the right of internally displaced persons to return to their homes. Every year more members of the UN vote in support of the resolution, which is a positive dynamic for the Georgian position. The number of voters has...
Policy Memos | Аналитика
Oxana Shevel 23 Jul 2012
When Russian forces went into South Ossetia last year, Russia cited the protection of its citizens as one justification for its actions. That more than half of South Ossetia's 70,000 residents have taken Russian citizenship is often mentioned. Less well known is the fact that South Ossetians (as well as residents of other breakaway regions who have obtained Russian citizenship) have usually been granted passports only for foreign travel, not internal...
Policy Memos | Аналитика
Nikolai Sokov 23 Jul 2012
In March 2005 negotiations over a long-stalled issue of Russian military bases in Georgia sharply accelerated. In the end of May, the foreign ministers of the two countries signed a joint statement, which stipulated that the withdrawal of bases would begin in 2005 and would conclude in 2008. Georgia, with good reason to celebrate, has declared once again that the removal of this thorny issue will facilitate friendly Russian-Georgian relations (despite...
Policy Memos | Аналитика
Nikolai Sokov 23 Jul 2012
The latest crisis in Russian-Georgian relations, precipitated by the arrest of four Russian officers in Georgia on suspicions of espionage, could put the United States in an awkward situation in which it will be forced to explicitly choose between one or the other side. The recent promise by Georgian Minister of Defense Irakli Okruashvili to celebrate the next New Year in Tskhinvali (the capital of the breakaway region of South Ossetia) apparently was...
Policy Memos | Аналитика
Nikolai Sokov 23 Jul 2012
A crisis between Georgia and Russia on April 12–13, 2002, had several new, troubling features, suggesting that war between Georgia and the breakaway region of Abkhazia or, even worse, an armed conflict between Georgia and Russia, might break out.    The increasingly dangerous trajectory of events in the South Caucasus requires close attention from Washington, particularly because U.S. military personnel might find...

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