Policy Memos | Аналитические записки

Policy Memo # 255
Vladimir Gelman 01 Oct 2002
After a bloody conflict in October 1993 between Russian president Boris Yeltsin and the Parliament, Russia’s elites recognized the need for strong parliamentary support of the federal executive. However, the nonpartisan nature of the Russian presidency and the lack of parliamentary accountability to the federal government have made for an uneasy institutional linkage between the federal executive and legislative branches. The...
Policy Memo # 254
Nikolai Sokov 01 Oct 2002
In August-September 2002, Russia appeared to have a short romance with the U.S. policy of preemption, which was annoucned months before and made official in the National Security Strategy issued by the White House in September 2002. A Russian pro-government Internet news service "Strana.ru" declared that "preemptive strikes against terrorists are the doctrine of common sense." Gleb Pavlovskii, who is widely assumed to have been one of...
Policy Memo # 253
Matthew Evangelista 01 Oct 2002
In the weeks leading up to his election as president of Russia in March 2000, journalists asked Vladimir Putin which political leaders he found “most interesting.” They took his first answer, Napoleon Bonaparte, as a joke, so he offered Charles de Gaulle as his second choice. One can easily see the appeal of the French general who came to power in the wake of the failed Fourth Republic, determined to revive France’s...
Policy Memo # 252
Douglas Blum 01 Oct 2002
In the early fall of 2002, two developments concerning Georgia garnered a great deal of attention. The first was the groundbreaking ceremony for the long-awaited Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan (BTC) pipeline, which has been heralded as an important source of non-OPEC oil. The second was a confrontation with Russia, which had been building over the preceding months amid allegations by Moscow that the Shevardnadze regime was aiding and abetting Chechen rebels, who...
Policy Memo # 251
Pavel Baev 01 Oct 2002
Georgia is the only post-Soviet neighbor—and, in fact, the only country in the world—with which Russia has a protracted and carefully cultivated political conflict that periodically escalates and generates serious military tension. Russian president Vladimir Putin’s “no-holds-barred” ultimatum of September 11 created the impression of an imminent war, averted only by his friendly chat with Georgian president Eduard...
Policy Memo # 250
Mikhail Alexseev 01 Oct 2002
Having enlisted Putin’s support in the global war on terrorism, the White House has not publicly protested the continuing zachistki (cleansing raids) and other systematic abuses of Chechen civilians by the Russian military and police special operation forces—the frequency and intensity of which, according to the Human Rights Watch, have increased since September 11, 2001. The Bush administration has not condemned or threatened...
Policy Memo # 249
Throughout much of the 1990s, the United States could not rely on the support of any ally except the United Kingdon (UK) for its unilateralist military strikes against Iraq. In view of the track record and semi-isolation of Baghdad’s regime, few governments, however, were willing or ready to object openly to repeated U.S. air strikes. Of these governments, Russia has been the most persistent and active critic of U.S....
Policy Memo # 248
Celeste A. Wallander 01 Oct 2002
The puzzle is why a Russia that has improved its relations with the United States and Western Europe, that has supported the United States in the fight against the Taliban and Al Qaeda in Central Asia, and that seeks membership in the World Trade Organization (WTO) and to attract foreign investment would maintain and even deepen trade with North Korea, Iran, and Iraq—countries with regimes that reject market economics and democracy....
Policy Memo # 247
Nikolai Sokov 01 Apr 2002
A crisis between Georgia and Russia on April 12–13, 2002, had several new, troubling features, suggesting that war between Georgia and the breakaway region of Abkhazia or, even worse, an armed conflict between Georgia and Russia, might break out.    The increasingly dangerous trajectory of events in the South Caucasus requires close attention from Washington, particularly because U.S. military personnel might find...
Policy Memo # 246
Fiona Hill 01 Apr 2002
When President Vladimir Putin picked up the phone to express his sympathy to President George W. Bush in the aftermath of September 11, and then followed-up by providing concrete assistance to the campaign in Afghanistan and quickly acquiescing to U.S. plans to establish bases in Central Asia, Washington policymakers and analysts reasonably concluded Putin had made a strategic, even historic, choice to align Russia’s foreign...

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