Policy Memos | Аналитические записки

Policy Memo # 98
Eva Busza 01 Dec 1999
The convergence of a number of factors--both domestic and foreign--has provided the Russian military with a golden opportunity to increase its power in Russian politics. The conduct of the Russian intervention in Chechnya provides ample evidence that the military is taking advantage of this chance. Increased military involvement in policymaking is likely to be both dangerous to future democratic development and may lead to Russia's further alienation...
Policy Memo # 97
Steve Solnick 01 Oct 1999
The Russian state is highly fragmented, lacking a unified legal or economic space. Nevertheless, fragmentation need not signal disintegration--officials of Russia's central government have proven resourceful at using the leverage of scarce resources to keep Russia intact. This memo examines the mechanisms of central control over Russia's regions. It has three primary goals, addressed in three separate sections: 1. It briefly reviews the history...
Policy Memo # 96
Nikolay Petrov 01 Oct 1999
The Federation Council, the upper chamber of the Russian parliament (also referred to as the "senate,") plays a number of different roles. It is an instrument for reconciling the interests of regional and federal elites and for lobbying regional interests. It is a political tribune for regional leaders to address the president, the government and the people. It is a new kind of meeting for the party and administrative elite (partkhozaktiv, like...
Policy Memo # 95
Matthew Evangelista 01 Oct 1999
In the Russian North Caucasus history repeats itself again and again, always as tragedy. Russia's leaders seem incapable of grasping the subtle complexities of politics in Dagestan and Chechnya, despite over two centuries of contact with the region. Moscow's latest military actions promise to make a bad situation even worse. The most recent round of violent conflict in the North Caucasus broke out in August 1999 when Russian military forces...
Policy Memo # 94
Mikhail Alexseev 01 Oct 1999
The improvement of relations between Moscow and Beijing in the late 1980s and the demise of the Soviet Union lifted the political, economic and cultural isolation of the Russian Far East from China. While creating economic incentives for cooperation, the cross-border flow of people, goods, and services has given rise to security concerns and socioeconomic grievances among political elites and the public in the Russian Far East. In Primorski Krai (Primor...
Policy Memo # 93
Nikolai Sokov 01 Oct 1999
To some, the title of this memo might seem an overstatement. After all, Russia is engaged in two sets of important arms control negotiations. The CFE-2 talks are nearing completion and the Russian side seems reasonably satisfied with the outcome. Russia and the United States have officially launched consultations on the START III treaty and modification of the ABM Treaty after yet another failure in the continuing saga of START II...
Policy Memo # 92
Pavel Podvig 01 Oct 1999
In recent months the United States and Russia have made an attempt to revive the arms control dialogue. But instead of bringing a solution to the problems that hold up nuclear disarmament, this attempt has done nothing but expose the huge gap between the positions of the two countries on the most contentious issues, missile defense and START II ratification.   The United States began the recent round of consultations with the...
Policy Memo # 91
Assertions by the Russian military that all of their nuclear weapons are secure against theft and that nuclear units within the military are somehow insulated from the problems plaguing the Russian military should not be accepted uncritically. Accordingly, we should not give unwarranted credence to the pronouncements of military figures like Col.-Gen. Igor Valynkin, Chief of the Defense Ministry's 12th Main Directorate, which ...
Tags:Russia, Ball
Policy Memo # 90
David Woodruff 01 Oct 1999
Russia is at a crossroads in dealing with one of its greatest dilemmas: how to set the ruble's exchange rate. The August 1998 financial crisis led to a very sharp and sustained drop in the ruble's exchange rate against the dollar. By the end of the year the ruble had lost 70% of its pre-crisis dollar value. Over the first nine months of 1999 the ruble lost an additional 17% of its dollar value. The exchange rate reached 25 to 1...
Policy Memo # 89
Astrid Tuminez 01 Oct 1999
The most dire predictions about the Russian economy after the August 1998 financial crisis have not come true. Devaluation, for example, has led to import substitution and created growth in some sectors of the economy. Hyperinflation has been avoided, and a strong recovery in oil prices has boosted tax receipts. A Paris Club rescheduling of Soviet-era debt has given Russia some debt relief, while renewed funding from the IMF and...

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