Policy Memos | Аналитические записки

Policy Memo # 43
Nikolai Sokov 01 Nov 1998
The recent announcement by vice-premier Yuri Masliukov that Russia would produce 30-40 Topol-M (SS-27) single-warhead ICBMs annually put the finishing touches on Russia's defense policy under the conditions of economic crisis. This statement would have come as a surprise to anyone who expected that nuclear weapons production would be scaled down or even discontinued after August 1998. This seemingly paradoxical policy begs for an explanation. The...
Policy Memo # 42
Henry Hale 01 Nov 1998
Despite the clear progress in Russian democratization at the federal level, the trend appears to be in the opposite direction at the regional level, a movement spearheaded by the Federation's constituent ethnic republics. This trend is likely to continue since Russian central power is weak and because local autocracy gives local leaders greater power on the federal stage since they have greater power to deliver votes in federal races. The...
Tags:Russia, Hale
Policy Memo # 41
Jeffrey Checkel 01 Nov 1998
A casual reader of Western media in Europe and the US, in particular, might be excused for believing that the potential for a new US-Russian Cold War had increased significantly as of mid-September. The catalyst for this change was not geo-political or politico-economic but individual and idiosyncratic: the appointment of Yevgeniy Primakov as Russia's new prime minister. This memo argues that such a portrayal of the situation is seriously flawed:...
Tags:Russia
Policy Memo # 40
Stephen Hanson 01 Nov 1998
The most recent round of financial and political crises in Russia serve to underscore the growing power shift between the federal government in Moscow and the 89 units that comprise the Russian Federation. What follows is a brief examination of the formal and informal processes through which expanding spheres of political and economic autonomy have devolved to the Russian provinces. While these mechanisms include bilateral negotiations and the signing of...
Tags:Russia
Policy Memo # 39
Kathryn Stoner-Weiss 01 Nov 1998
The most recent round of financial and political crises in Russia serve to underscore the growing power shift between the federal government in Moscow and the 89 units that comprise the Russian Federation. What follows is a brief examination of the formal and informal processes through which expanding spheres of political and economic autonomy have devolved to the Russian provinces. While these mechanisms include bilateral negotiations and the...
Policy Memo # 38
David Woodruff 01 Nov 1998
Barter and other closely related forms of non-monetary exchange present a critical challenge for Russian public policy. As of early 1998, from 50 to 70% of exchange in industry took the form of barter, leaving many firms with too little cash to pay salaries and taxes. Both the federal and local governments use non-monetary taxation extensively. In 1997, at least one quarter of the revenue collected for the federal budget took a non-monetary form. Although...
Policy Memo # 37
Mark Kramer 01 Nov 1998
This policy memo discusses economic reform in Russia and the role of the US government between 1992 and 1998. It begins by reviewing the general strategy of shock therapy in Eastern Europe, comparing it with what actually happened in Russia. It then highlights the shortcomings of US support for specific economic policies in Russia and the pressure exerted by the United States on the International Monetary Fund (IMF) when the Fund was reluctant to provide...
Policy Memo # 36
Randall Stone 01 Nov 1998
This policy memo discusses economic reform in Russia and the role of the US government between 1992 and 1998. It begins by reviewing the general strategy of shock therapy in Eastern Europe, comparing it with what actually happened in Russia. It then highlights the shortcomings of US support for specific economic policies in Russia and the pressure exerted by the United States on the International Monetary Fund (IMF) when the Fund was reluctant to provide...
Policy Memo # 35
Pauline Jones 01 Nov 1998
The ruble's imminent plummet, amid increasing revenue shortages and foreign debt, has been the focus of international attention toward Russia and elite domestic strife within Russia for the past several months. In their desperate attempt to find a solution, as well as to avoid taking (their share of) the blame, both sides have cited separate causes. International lenders claim that the primary source of Russia's economic ills is the government...
Policy Memo # 34
Kimberly Marten 01 Sep 1998
It is a well known fact that the Russian military today is in terrible shape. Funding shortfalls are so severe that basic needs go unmet. Neither officers nor troops get paid on time, many officers' families are living in abysmal conditions because adequate housing is not available, food supplies for the troops have frequently been found to be contaminated or unfit for human consumption, and the amount of time given to combat training is very low...

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