Brian Taylor 19 Jun 2013
Since his removal as Russian Minister of Finance in September 2011, Aleksey Kudrin has repeatedly stated his disagreement with the government’s economic policies. Indeed, his objection to state spending priorities was one of the principal reasons for his departure, and it remains one of the central obstacles to his return to government service. Specifically, as Kudrin noted in October 2011, if he determined budget policy he “would increase...
Andrey Makarychev 14 Jun 2013
The concept “emerging power” is fashionable among specialists in international relations. However, questions abound. Is an emerging power a state that is pragmatically using a moment of Western weakening to secure some space for itself? Or are they states that present serious and substantial movements challenging the exclusivity of the West and its power strongholds? Are new forms of hegemony emerging as new powers ascend to the upper leagues...
Juliet Johnson 14 Jun 2013
The BRICS states—Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa—have increasingly sought to develop and diversify the international monetary system in ways that do not rely on dialogue with the system’s traditional powers. They are now using the BRICS forum to reinforce economic cooperation among themselves and to create alternatives and work-arounds to existing international institutions. Russia’s official “Concept of the Russian Federation’s...
Dmitry Gorenburg 14 Jun 2013
In the five years of Anatoly Serdyukov’s tenure as defense minister, the Russian military underwent one of the most significant reforms of any period since the formation of the modern Soviet Army during and immediately after World War II. As part of this reform, the military shed most of its Soviet legacy in areas such as organizational structure and manpower. The transformation, however, alienated the officer corps, with most senior generals...
One of the consequences of Russia’s recent political foment has been a phenomenon experts have labeled “nationalization of the elites.” The goal of the policy, which Vladimir Putin launched soon after his return to the presidency, was to reduce the odds that public servants and politicians would have multiple allegiances making them less loyal to the Kremlin. The most conspicuous element of the policy has been a recently adopted law banning...
Serghei Golunov 14 Jun 2013
From time to time, Russian authorities appeal to Western experience for different reasons. While they sometimes do this to signal the need to adopt advanced managerial or other best practices, in many cases they employ such references to neutralize Western criticism and justify undemocratic (and unpopular) moves by pointing to the West’s own imperfections. In 2008, the Economist labeled this tactic whataboutism, and it has become one of...
Andrey Makarychev 13 Jun 2013
The first European Workshops in International Studies (EWIS) gave a comprehensive view of the state of the discipline, with 14 sessions running in parallel and 200 researchers participating. Global governance is still on the top of the research agenda, despite the progressing fragmentation of the West and the uncertainty concerning the international intentions of "rising powers." Practically half of the participants chose to speak about norms,...
Dmitry Gorenburg 10 Jun 2013
At the end of May, I spent a week in Moscow doing some research on various topics. Although it wasn't the central focus of my interviews, I took the opportunity to discuss the state of the Russian military with several scholars and journalists. What follows is a brief summary of my impressions from these conversations. Shoigu is not reversing Serdyukov's reform. With only one exception, all of my interlocutors agreed that Shoigu is maintaining...

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