Policy Memos | Аналитические записки

Policy Memo # 403
The recent request of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) to the United States to set deadlines for the temporary use of its bases in Central Asia, and Uzbekistan’s subsequent demand that the United States vacate its Karshi-Khanabad (K2) base came as a shock and triggered talk in Washington about a great game, similar to the great power competition between the Russian Empire and Great Britain over the same region in the 19th century. This...
Policy Memo # 402
Central Asia’s growing instability has opened the region to a host of would-be political entrepreneurs. The March and May 2005 uprisings in Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan underscored the weakness of Eurasian authoritarianism and emboldened both domestic and international actors to stake new claims in Central Asia’s increasingly uncertain political landscape. Some of these actors seek deepened political and economic reform. Others, however, are...
Policy Memo # 401
On July 29, 2005, President Islam Karimov ordered the U.S. military facility at Karshi-Khanabad (K2), Uzbekistan to close down within 180 days. It now appears virtually certain that U.S. forces will leave by January 2006. In September 2005, Karimov went further, declaring he would end all security cooperation with the United States in the war on terror, a complete turnaround for a leader who had been a close U.S. ally since September 11. Why did Karimov...
Policy Memo # 400
In July 2005, the government of Uzbekistan expelled the United States from the Karshi-Khanabad (K2) air base from which U.S. forces had conducted reconnaissance and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom in neighboring Afghanistan since autumn 2001. Prior to the eviction the Uzbek government had grown wary of mounting international and U.S. criticism over its hard-line policies, especially its May crackdown on protestors in the eastern city of...
Policy Memo # 399
Counterterrorism has never been a convincing Russian strategy for Central Asia. At the start of Vladimir Putin’s presidency, attempts to impress upon the leaders of the five Central Asian states that only Russia could provide security in the face of this rising threat were undermined by a clear inability to offer any assistance in repelling incursions into Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan by the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan...
Policy Memo # 398
Valerie Sperling 01 Dec 2005
In September 2004, in the aftermath of the devastating terrorist attack on a  public school in Beslan, North Ossetia, Russian President Vladimir Putin announced a series of proposed changes to Russia’s political system. The intention of these reforms, according to Putin, would be to fight terrorism by “strengthening the political system” and ensuring the “unity of state power.” Eight months later, Putin’s...
Tags:
Policy Memo # 397
There is little question that Vladimir Putin’s Kremlin is developing a strategy to preserve power beyond the 2007-2008 election cycle. There is also little question that neither his potential political rivals nor we will know what that strategy is until very late in the game. Just as Yeltsin did before him, Putin will reveal his plan at the last possible moment. The logic of waiting is inescapable. Regardless of the ultimate...
Tags:
Policy Memo # 396
The first year of Russian President Vladimir Putin’s second term has been disastrous. A series of crises has occurred, from the assassination of Chechen President Akhmad Kadyrov in Grozny in May 2004, to the widespread demonstrations against the government’s seriously flawed attempt to replace social and other benefits with cash payments. Fighters staged raids in Grozny and Ingushetia, the government provoked a minor banking crisis, the...
Tags:
Policy Memo # 395
Former Yukos chairman Mikhail Khodorkovsky’s letter warning of the inevitable “left turn” in Russian politics that would follow an emerging left turn in Russian society was one of the topics of discussion during the weeks preceding the ruling on his case by the Russian Court of Appeals in September 2005. Khodorkovsky’s reasoning, which primarily looks like the mea culpa of a former beneficiary of unjust privatization and the...
Tags:
Policy Memo # 394
Oleg Kharkhordin 01 Dec 2005
The Year 2000 Millennium threat, linked to a potential computer breakdown, was never a big concern for Russian policymakers. By contrast, when Anatoly Chubais first formulated the problem of 2003 as the year of a total infrastructural meltdown, he was pointing to the most poignant issue that bedevils Russian publics and governments of all levels. Given the absence of investment into the maintenance, upgrade, and modernization of urban infrastructure since...

Pages

Links / Ссылки