Policy Memos | Аналитические записки

Policy Memo # 215
Regina Smyth 03 Sep 2012
“Russia Without Putin!” Such battle cries by anti-regime protesters took sharp aim at a pillar of Russia’s electoral authoritarian regime: Vladimir Putin’s personalist link to voters. With chants of “Putin-Thief” and “Putin-Leave” accompanied by derogatory posters and cartoonish effigies, Russian protesters crossed a very bright line: equating Putin with regime failings. The Kremlin countered with mass...
Policy Memo # 214
Graeme Robertson 03 Sep 2012
Election-monitoring reports from both international and domestic election observers often play a key role in post-election politics. The extent to which election observers are trusted or influential thus is of critical importance. However, while there is now a growing body of research on the quality of election observation, less is known about how crucial constituencies within the countries being monitored feel about and react to the verdicts handed down...
Policy Memo # 213
Nikolay Petrov 03 Sep 2012
In December 2011, a volcano of social activism that had long been dormant started to erupt in Russia, thrusting the country’s domestic politics into headlines around a world recently captivated by the Arab Spring. Contrary to the expectations of the Kremlin and some observers, the eruptions did not stop after the presidential elections in March 2012, when Vladimir Putin was successfully elected president for the third time. It is noteworthy that...
Policy Memo # 212
Reacting to the events in Moscow of May 6, 2012, when opposition protests led to massive clashes with the police for the first time, Russian presidential spokesman Dmitry Peskov described the protesters as “marginal personalities” who were far outnumbered by those demonstrating in support of President Vladimir Putin. This assessment is widely shared by Russians loyal to the regime, both officials and ordinary people. At a superficial glance,...
Policy Memo # 211
Theodore Gerber 01 Sep 2012
Efforts by the United States to promote democracy and civil society in Russia by directly supporting institutions such as political parties, nongovernmental organizations, alternative media outlets, and opposition groups have reached a critical juncture. The Russian government’s recent crackdown on foreign-funded NGOs, restrictions on the internet, and pressure on opposition leaders appear to be supported by the population. Anti-American sentiment...
Policy Memo # 210
Shairbek Juraev 01 Jun 2012
Speaking in July 2011 on the occasion of the one-year anniversary of Kyrgyzstan’s new constitution, then-President Roza Otunbaeva declared that the key task for the Kyrgyz citizenry was “to make a return to authoritarianism impossible.” Her comment conveyed both a celebratory note about the eradication of the previous authoritarian regime and pointed to the key threat going forward. A multiparty parliament, a three-party coalition...
Policy Memo # 209
Sergey Minasyan 01 Jun 2012
It is widely believed that foreign policy is an extension of domestic policy. But the opposite is also true: domestic policy can stem from foreign policy. This memo explores the interplay of domestic and foreign policy as they relate to two major issues in post-Soviet Armenia. The first is the conflict over Nagorno-Karabakh. For two decades, this conflict has influenced the domestic development of independent Armenia, while its domestic repercussions...
Policy Memo # 208
Harris Mylonas 01 Jun 2012
Given the absence of enlargement progress in the May 2012 NATO summit and enlargement fatigue in the European Union, it is high time to reconsider the future of Euro-Atlantic integration in the Western Balkans—an area that includes all the former Yugoslav republics plus Albania. The Euro-Atlantic integration of postcommunist Europe began hesitantly in the 1990s and reached its apogee during the 2000s. In the Balkans, the membership of Slovenia,...
Policy Memo # 207
Ayse Zarakol 01 Jun 2012
More than a year after the inception of the so-called Arab Spring, Turkey’s much-ballyhooed regional rise is teetering on the brink. Especially in its ability to influence outcomes in Syria, but also in its reading of regional dynamics in general, Turkey finds itself consistently outmaneuvered by other regional powers like Russia and Iran with longer standing interests in the Middle East. Furthermore, the convergence between the positions of Turkey...
Policy Memo # 206
Andrey Makarychev 01 Jun 2012
The resumption of Vladimir Putin’s presidency and the strengthening of nationalist rhetoric during his presidential campaign significantly complicated Russia’s relations with the European Union and its major member states. Most pro-Kremlin observers assert that Russia—even if it wanted to—cannot integrate with the West: the latter’s major institutions—the EU and NATO—are in crisis and their future uncertain....

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